Faculty

SCIENTIFIC SECRETARIAT

Domenico Mavilio Chairman
University of Milan, Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy
Francesco Dieli Local organizer
University of Palermo, Italy

MEMBERS OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Ivona Aksentijevich
National Human Research Genome Institute, Bethesda, USA
Manfred Boehm
Center for Molecular Medicine, NHLBI-NIH
Marco Cassatella
University of Verona, Italy
Marco Gattorno
Institute Giannina Gaslini, Genova, Italy
Steve Holland
Laboratory of Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine, NIH
Massimo Locati
University of Milan, Italy
Enrico Lugli
Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Italy
Luis Montaner
The Wistar Institute
Richard Siegel
National Institutes of Health
Anna Villa
Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Italy

INVITED SPEAKERS

Alberto Mantovani
Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Italy
Michele de Palma
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Lausanne, Switzerland.
Carola Ries
Roche Innovation Center Munich, Germany
Massimiliano Mazzone
University of Leuven, Belgium
Bruno Silva-Santos
Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)
Franco Locatelli

Dimitry Gabrilovich
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Elisabeth Murchison
University of Cambridge, UK
Frank Kirchhoff
Ulm University Medical Center, Germany
David B. Weiner
Wistar Vaccine Center – University of Pennsylvania, USA
Mario Roederer
Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH
Silvia Della Bella
Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Italy
Edoardo Fiorillo
Istituto di Ricerca Genetica e Biomedica (IRGB), CNR, Italy
Robert Balderas

Ido Amit
Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Charles Dinarello
University of Colorado, USA – Radboud University, Netherlands
Dan Kastner

Mariana Kaplan
National Institutes of Health, USA
Alberto Martini
Gaslini Institute, Genoa, Italy
Yenan Bryceson
Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge
Min Ae Lee-Kirsch
Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus – Technische Universität Dresden, Germany
Cornelia Weyand
Stanford University School of Medicine
Luigi Naldini
Professore Ordinario di Istologia, Direttore Istituto Telethon San Raffaele per la Terapia Genica, Milano
Ridha Barbouche
Institut Pasteur de Tunis
Alain Fischer
Fondation Imagine, Paris, France
Gioacchino Natoli
European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Italy
Camilla Jandus
University of Losanna
Robert C. Gallo
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Miguel López-Botet
Univ. Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Barcelona)
Francesco Annunziato
Società Italiana di Immunologia
Boro Dropulic
Lentigen Technology, Inc
Yanet Valdez
Senior Scientist StemCell Technologies
Antonio Sica
University of Piemonte Orientale A. Avogadro, Novara, Italy

SCIENTIFIC SECRETARIAT

Chairman

mavilio

Domenico Mavilio

Principal Investigator leading the Unit of Clinical and Experimental Immunology at Humanitas Research Hospital
Associate Professor at the Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, University of Milan
Chairman of the Meeting

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Domenico Mavilio (M.D., Ph.D.) is a Principal Investigator, Head of the Unit of Clinical and Experimental Immunology at Humanitas Research Hospital and Associate Professor of Translational Medicine at Medical School of University of Milan.
In 2008, he started his career as indipendent researcher in his home country after spent several years at National Institute of Allergy and Infection Diseases (NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA) as research fellow heading the innate immune section of the Laboratory of Immunoregolation directed by Dr. A.S. Fauci.

Dr. Mavilio’s scientific interests are focused on innate immune responses and his laboratory is currently performing project of translational immunology investigation on the homeostasis of innate immune cell in human tissues and on the role of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders, HIV-1 infection and cancer. More info are available at http://www.humanitas.it/hur/cms/english/activities/lab/index.html. Contact: domenico.mavilio@unimi.it.

Local organizer

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Francesco Dieli

Central Laboratory of Advanced Diagnosis and Biomedical Research and Department of Biopathology, University of Palermo

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Francesco Dieli obtained his degree with honors in Medicine in 1983 at the University of Palermo, where he specialized in Immunology and Pathology in 1987. He obtained a PhD in Immunology at Stockholm University in 1999. Research Fellow at the Laboratory of Immunogenetics, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro (IST), Genova, Italy in 1988; Research Fellow at the Department of Immunological Medicine, Clinical Research Centre, London from 1989 to 1992; Swedish Institute Research Fellow, Department of Immunology, Stockholm University, Stockholm in 1999. He is full professor of Immunology and Director of the Biomedical Research Centre at the University of Palermo, Italy. Professor Dieli’s research has covered several aspects of human immunology: delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and cancer immunotherapy. Professor Dieli has published over 180 papers in peer reviewed scientific journals and is author of 4 patents. Professor Dieli was awarded the Albanese prize in 1983 and the Lauro Chiazzese prize in 1986. He is honorary member of the National Academy of Science since 2001, honorary member of the Academy of Medical Sciences since 2002, Fellow of the Swedish Institute and Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, UK. Professor Dieli if founding member of the biopharmaceutical company TetraPharm s.r.l. and Dean of the International PhD program in Immunopharmacology at the University of Palermo. Professor Dieli serves on the Scientific Advisory Committees of numerous academic and private sector research organizations and is a member of several editorial boards in the fields of immunology.

MEMBERS OF THE SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

 

Ivona Aksentijevich

Ivona Aksentijevich

Staff Scientist, National Human Research Genome Institute, Bethesda, USA

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Ivona Aksentijevich M.D. is a Staff Scientist in the National Human Research Genome Institute, Bethesda, USA. Dr. Aksentijevich is Board certified in Clinical Molecular Genetics and she runs the molecular diagnostic laboratory for patients with autoinflammatory diseases. During her research career she has been a major participant, either as the first or the senior author, in a number of research studies related to genetics and pathophysiology of autoinflammatory diseases (FMF, TRAPS, NOMID, DIRA, APLAID, DADA2, CANDLE, HA20). She is the current president of the International Society of Systemic Autoinflammatory Diseases (ISSAID)

Manfred Boehm

Manfred Boehm

Senior Investigator
Center for Molecular Medicine, NHLBI-NIH

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Manfred Boehm, M.D. is a Senior Investigator at the Center for Molecular Medicine, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, USA.
Dr. Boehm received his M.D. from the University of Heidelberg, Germany and completed his medical training at the Franz-Vollhard-Klinik, Charité, Humboldt Universtität and Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.
The Boehm Lab’s research interests are to identify and better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human vascular diseases and to develop new therapeutic approaches. The aims of the Vascular Translational Program align with the principles of Precision Medicine, investigating how individual variations in genes, environment, and lifestyle contribute to vascular disease. This program was designed to link high-throughput sequencing data with molecular disease mechanisms to facilitate the development of targeted therapies for patients with vascular disorders. The Boehm Lab has successfully identified and/or is currently working on the mechanism underlying rare monogenetic diseases with vascular implications, including Arterial Calcification due to Deficiency of CD73 (ACDC), Systemic inflammation and early-onset recurrent stroke in children due to Deficiency of Adenosine Deaminase 2 (DADA2), STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI), and Hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES), a primary immunodeficiency caused by loss-of-function mutations in Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3). Research findings from these human rare monogenetic diseases with vascular implications have lead to novel treatment strategies for affected patients.

Marco Cassatella

Marco Cassatella

Department of Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Verona,
Strada Le Grazie 4, Verona, Italy

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Appointed in 2011 as Full Professor of General Pathology at the University of Verona, Medical School, Department of Pathology and Diagnostics.

Author of 180 original publications on international journals (including Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Reviews Immunology, Immunity, J.Exp. Med., J. Clin. Invest., Nature Communications, BLOOD, JACI and Trends in Immunology). Author and Editor of books/book chapters, including one for Fundamental Immunology (7th ed 2012).

Section Editor/Reviewer of: Nature, Science, Immunity, Nature Immunology, Trends in Immunology, Blood, J. Clin. Invest., Nature Communications, J. Immunology, European J. Immunology, Immunology, Infection & Immunity, Laboratory Investigation, Cancer Research, Cellular Immunology, Arthritis and Rheumatism, Trends in Microbiology and others.

Financed by grants from MIUR, AIRC, NATO, CARIVERONA, MARIE CURIE, ISS

Member of Advisory Boards and Grant Committees, including the Telethon Scientific Committee

Invited speaker, chairman and Scientific Organizer of national or international meetings (Gordon Conferences, ICI2007, ECI2009, ECI2012, TLR2011, ICI2013, SL2016).

During the last years, MC has been involved in studies concerning the mechanisms regulating, at molecular level, the effector functions of innate immune cells. In particular, he has greatly contributed to uncover the notion that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), other than being cytokine targets, also represent a source of numerous immunoregulatory molecules, including cytokines and chemokines. Current research interests are the understanding of: 1) the molecular mechanisms regulating TLR4- and TLR8-mediated gene expression in myeloid cells; 2) The molecular mechanisms controlling cytokine/gene expression in activated neutrophils ands monocytes: 3) The characterization and pathological relevance of the reciprocal interactions between human neutrophils and immunoregulatory/effector cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems; 4) The molecular basis regulating IL-10 responsiveness in activated phagocytes; 4) The role of slanDC in human tumors; 5) the epigenetic control of gene expression in neutrophils.

Marco Gattorno

Marco Gattorno

U.O.C. Pediatria II – Reumatologia
IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini

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Pediatric Rheumatologists, working at “G. Gaslini” Institute for Children in Genoa, Italy. His main scientific interests involve the study of the pathogenic mechanisms of the rheumatic conditions in children and the clinical and pathogenic characterization of the monogenic autoinflammatory diseases. He is author of 158 full-papers on international journals (total IF 930, H-index 40), of many book chapters (i.e. “The Immune System and the Inflammatory Response” in the Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology; JT Cassidy et al. eds; 5th, 6th and 7th Edition). He is the Editor of the book “Familial Mediterranean Fever” (Springer).

He received the 1998 and 1999 Pediatric Rheumatology Abstract Awards at the 62nd and 63rd Congress of the American College of Rheumatology and the Kourir Award 13th Congress of Pediatric Rheumatology European Society, Amsterdam, June 2006

He is the past-Chairman of the Working Party for Autoinflammatory diseases of the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society (PRES).

From July 2008 he is the Principal Investigator of the “Eurofever” Project (UE – Executive Agency for Health and Consumers; www.printo/eurofever). From May 2016 is the Principal Investigator of the E-rare project INSAID (E-Rare JTC 2015-pp-156).

Steve Holland

Steve Holland

Chief, Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases
Chief, Immunopathogenesis Section, NIH

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Dr. Holland received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1983, where he stayed as a resident in internal medicine, assistant chief of service in medicine, and fellow in infectious diseases. He came to the National Institutes of Health in 1989 as a National Research Council fellow in the Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, working on transcriptional regulation of HIV. In 1991, Dr. Holland joined the Laboratory of Host Defenses, shifting his research to the host side, with a focus on phagocyte defects and their associated infections. His work centered on the pathogenesis and management of chronic granulomatous disease, as well as other congenital immune defects affecting phagocytes, including those predisposing to mycobacterial diseases. In 2004, he became chief of LCID.

Massimo Locati

Massimo Locati

University of Milan, Professor of Immunology and General Pathology at the Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine and chief of the Leukocyte Biology Lab at the Humanitas Clinical and Reseach Center

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Massimo Locati (ORCID: 0000-0003-3077-590X) graduated summa cum laude in Medicine in 1992 from University of Milan, Italy. He was then Research Fellow in the Department of Immunology and Cell Biology at Mario Negri Institute, Milan (1992-1995) and subsequently in the Laboratory of Host Defenses, National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Washington (1995-1996). During these years he was mainly involved in the definition of chemokine receptors signalling properties and in particular he defined the role of chemokine receptors’ signalling in HIV-1 infection. He was then enrolled as Research Assistant at the University of Brescia (1998) and subsequently moved to the University of Milan (2001), were he is now Professor of Immunology and General Pathology at the Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine and chief of the Leukocyte Biology Lab at the Humanitas Clinical and Reseach Center.

In his scientific career he has contributed to the identification of chemokine receptors and their biological role in inflammatory diseases, to the identification of atypical/decoy chemokine receptors, to the definitionand molecular characterization of macrophage polarized activation (M1/M2 signatures). The lab is now focused on molecular mechanisms controlling inflammatory responses and their resolution (mechanism of action and biological relevance of atypical receptors and identification and functional characterization of inflammation-related microRNA) and on macrophage biology in tumors (from their recruitment to their polarized activation and underlying molecular mechanisms, with particular relevance to inflammation-related microRNA). On these topics he has authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications, with a total Impact Factor above 850 and 14000 citations. His present H index is 53.

Enrico Lugli

Enrico Lugli

Head of Translational Immunology Lab
Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Italy

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I obtained a PhD in Immunology in 2008 from the University Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy, under the supervision of Prof. Andrea Cossarizza where I studied T cell immune responses and homeostasis during the course of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. I then moved to the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, USA to join the ImmunoTechnology Section directed by Dr. Mario Roederer. There, I studied the molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of long-lived T cell immunity in humans and nonhuman primates. In collaboration with Dr. Thomas Waldmann, I moved Interleukin (IL)-15, a cytokine capable of activating anti-tumor effector cells, from the preclinical level to the first-in-human phase I clinical trial in patients with solid cancers. Since 2013, I have been a Junior Investigator at the Humanitas Clinical and Research Center under the supervision of Prof. Domenico Mavilio, and since 2015 an independent principal investigator of the Laboratory of Translational Immunology.

Luis Montaner

Luis Montaner

Luis J. Montaner, D.V.M., M.Sc., D.Phil.Kean Family; Endowed Chair Professor; Director, HIV-1 Immunopathogenesis Laboratory; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Leukocyte Biology
The Wistar Institute

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Dr. Luis Montaner was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He attended Kansas State University, where he received a B.S. in 1989 and his D.V.M., M.Sc. in 1991. Dr. Montaner completed his doctoral training at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, UK in 1995. He has been appointed at The Wistar Institute since 1995. Dr. Montaner directs multi-institutional and multi-investigator clinical studies with a basic research component and is Director of the HIV-Immunopathogenesis Laboratory. He has enjoyed an active research partnership with community health center Philadelphia FIGHT for more than 20 years. He currently serves as Editor-In-Chief of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology with an editorial staff of over 50 investigators. In December 2014, Dr. Montaner was awarded the Herbert Kean, M.D. Family Professorship, a five-year endowment that recognizes high-risk, high-reward research. His research is primarily focused on innate effectors, immune regulation of infection, activation measurements on ART, and translational human immunology-based studies. Dr. Montaner has received numerous distinctions for his work on behalf of people living with HIV/AIDS, including the Jonathan Lax Award from Philadelphia FIGHT, the Founders’ Award from the AIDS Fund of Philadelphia, and a Recognition and Honors Resolution from the Philadelphia City Council. Dr. Montaner and his team are currently enrolling participants in the largest HIV Cure research clinical trial to date.

Richard Siegel

Richard Siegel

Richard Siegel, M.D., Ph.D.
Chief, Immunoregulation Section
Autoimmunity Branch
Clinical Director, NIAMS
National Institutes of Health

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A native New Yorker, Dr. Siegel obtained his B.S. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale and completed M.D./Ph.D. training at the University of Pennsylvania. Richard’s interest in immunology, autoimmunity, and apoptosis began at Penn where he studied the effects of the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2 on T cell development. He trained in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology at Penn, and then moved to the NIH to do postdoctoral training 1996, where he worked in Michael Lenardo’s laboratory in NIAID studying the molecular basis of autoimmunity in the Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS). Since 2001, Dr. Siegel has been in the NIAMS IRP where he directs a lab focused on understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases at the molecular level, focusing on the TNF cytokine superfamily. Understanding how membrane-proximal events in TNF receptor signal transduction interact with other receptor signaling pathways and cellular processes may aid in designing more effective therapeutic strategies to modulate the effects of TNF-receptor family signaling in disease. The laboratory also studies the pathogenesis of human diseases caused by alterations in genes encoding TNF family receptors and ligands and genes affecting their function, gaining insights into signal transduction mechanisms. Since 2011, in his role as Clinical Director, Dr. Siegel oversees the NIAMS IRP clinical research program, which comprises a rheumatology fellowship training program, advanced training of physician-scientists, and natural history and experimental clinical trials in both rare and common rheumatic diseases. Outside of the lab, Richard enjoys playing the violin in the NIH Philharmonia and other venues, and spending time with family at home and abroad.

Anna Villa

Anna Villa

IRGB Unità di Milano, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche- Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano (MI)

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Anna Villa is the Head of Unit at the Institute of Genetic and Biomedical Research, CNRat Humanitas Hospital and coordinates a group of gene therapy of primary immunodeficiency at the Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (SR-Tiget) in Milano. The main focus of her research has been the molecular and cellular dissection of severe combined immunodeficiencies. She showed that hypomorphic mutations in Rag1 and Rag2 genes impairing but not abolishing the protein activities, are responsible for a peculiar SCID form, named Omenn syndrome. In parallel with the identification of genes involved in SCID, Anna Villa has addressed her studies to the efficacy and safety of gene therapy of Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, a complex and severe X-linked disorder characterized by micro-thrombocytopenia, eczema, immunodeficiency, and increased risk to develop autoimmunity. Using third generation of lentiviral vector carrying human WAS gene driven by its own promoter, she demonstrated that gene therapy can restore functional defects in T cells and in B cells. Thanks to the preclinical studies, a lentiviral vector based clinical trial for the human WAS disease is now undergoing at the San Raffaele Institute. Anna Villa has also strongly contributed to the molecular dissection of another important genetic disease. In the last years, she has directed her interests to a heterogeneous group of bone diseases, named Osteopetrosis. These studies represent the beginning of the molecular dissection of this complex and heterogenous inherited bone defects.

INVITED SPEAKER

Alberto Mantovani

Alberto Mantovani

Professor, Humanitas University; Scientific Director Istituto Clinico Humanitas

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Prof Alberto Mantovani is an immuno-oncologist with MD from the University of Milan, and specialisation in Oncology from University of Pavia. In the late 70s he demonstrated the pro-tumour function of tumour-associated macrophages (TAM) linking inflammation and cancer and has been at the forefront of the inflammation-cancer research since. He demonstrated the role of chemokines in TAM recruitment, as well as in pathophysiology, including dendritic cell and polarized T cell migration. His current research focuses on exploring therapeutic potential of targeting TAMs and on understanding the role of fluid patter recognition molecule pentraxin in innate resistance to infections.
For his research activity he has received several national and international awards. For several years now, bibliometric analyses have indicated that he is the most quoted italian scientist. The broad impact of the contribution of Alberto Mantovani is testified by citations (over 75,000 in October 2015 according to Scopus; H-index ISI 117; Scopus 134; Google Scholar 154). A bibliometric analysis indicates that he is one of the 10 most quoted immunologists worldwide (http://www.tisreports.com/products/19-Top_scientists_in_the_world___the_Via_academy_compilation.aspx).

Michele de Palma

Michele de Palma

École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Lausanne, Switzerland.

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Miki obtained his Ph.D. in 2004 from the University of Turin Medical School, Italy, where he studied the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor angiogenesis under the direction of gene therapy pioneer Luigi Naldini. He performed post-doctoral training at the Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (TIGET) in Milan, to develop gene transfer strategies for reprogramming tumor-infiltrating monocytes into anti-tumoral immune cells. In 2011, he was appointed tenure-track assistant professor at the ISREC institute of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, where he teaches cancer biology and leads a group of enthusiastic young scientists. By employing genetic models of cancer and cell-engineering strategies based on lentiviral gene transfer, the De Palma’s lab investigates the interplay among macrophages, blood vessels and T cells in tumors, primarily by focusing on angiogenic signaling, immune checkpoints, microRNA regulation, and secreted exosomes. Miki received a European Research Council grant and a number of prizes from scientific societies. He has co-organized, and is routinely invited to, international conferences on angiogenesis, tumor immunology and cancer research, and serves on the advisory boards of several scientific journals, including Science Translational Medicine (AAAS), Cell Reports (Cell press), and Cancer Immunology Research (AACR). In his spare time, he enjoys travelling to sub-saharan Africa and writing boring articles and books on the taxonomy of the African fruit and flower beetles.

Carola Ries

Carola Ries

Head of Cancer Immunotherapy I
Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development
Discovery Oncology
Roche Innovation Center Munich, Germany

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Carola Ries, PhD, is Expert Scientist in Roche’s Pharma Research and Early Development (pRED) organization at the Roche Innovation Center Munich, Germany. She heads the Cancer Immunotherapy I Department which aims to design novel therapeutics targeting the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. Carola Ries received her PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Aachen (1998), Germany. From 1998 to 2001, she did her postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Frank McCormick at the University of California, San Francisco, investigating the application of tumor-selectively replicating adenoviruses for cancer therapy (Onyx-015). She also studied the contribution of major signaling pathways, such as p53 and Ras signaling, to tumorigenesis and resistance to radiation therapy. Since 2003 Dr. Ries pursued cancer related drug discovery with Roche pRED applying e.g. three-dimensional culture models of tumor spheroids. In 2006 she established a team of scientists to develop and optimize an anti-CSF-1R antibody for therapeutic application, ranging from lead generation to preclinical development incl. safety assessment in cynomolgus monkeys. In 2011, phase 1 clinical development of the selected lead CSF-1R antibody emactuzumab started, and is accompanied by an extensive biomarker program. 2015, the first clinical trial evaluating emactuzumab in combination with the immune checkpoint inhibitor atezolizumab was initiated. Dr. Ries’ current research interest centers on deciphering the role of tumor associated macrophages in mediating immune suppression and resistance to cancer immunotherapies.

Massimiliano Mazzone

Massimiliano Mazzone

Prof. Massimiliano Mazzone, PhD
Head of the Lab of Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis

VIB Institute for Biotechnologies
Department of Oncology, University of Leuven (KU Leuven)
Campus Gasthuisberg, Belgium

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Massimiliano (Max) Mazzone graduated in Medical Biotechnology at the Medical School of the University of Torino, Italy, and then performed his PhD in Cell Science and Technologies at the Institute for Cancer Research of Torino, under the supervision of Prof. Comoglio. In November 2006, he moved to Belgium as an EMBO-awarded postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Prof. Peter Carmeliet, at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Since September 2009, he is heading the Lab of Molecular Oncology and Angiogenesis, at the Vesalius Research Center, part of the VIB in Leuven, and he is Full-Tenured Professor at the University of Leuven. Max Mazzone has contributed to the field of oncology understanding the mechanisms of cancer metastasis and to vascular biology identifying a new endothelial cell phenotype, the “phalanx” cell, which takes part in the formation of aligned blood vessels in perfused tissues. For this work (published in Cell), Dr. Mazzone was awarded by the Lorini Foundation. Since end of 2009 ,he is independent group leader and his team is focusing in studying the response of inflammatory cells to hypoxic conditions in order to restore blood flow and regulate favorably the immune response in conditions such as cancer and ischemic pathologies. Form there, Max got other important national awards (the Belgian Royal Academy Prize, the AIRC Price for excellence in science, EMBO awards, Chiara D’Onofrio Award, and recently the AstraZeneca Award) and international recognitions (ERC, EMBO, FEBS, Burgen Award, etc.). He is author more than 70 papers, with an average impact factor in first or senior corresponding author research papers of 21; more than 6000 citations; and an H-index of 33. He is member of the boards of several peer-reviewd journals (such as Cancer Research), he is reviewer for almost 20 journals, and he has been so far invited to speak in more than 60 national and international conferences (including GRC, Keystone, AACR, FEBS meetings, etc.). He currently holds an ERC starting grant and EMBO Young Investiga

Bruno Silva-Santos

Bruno Silva-Santos

Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal)

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Bruno Silva-Santos is a Group Leader and Vice-Director of Instituto de Medicina Molecular (IMM), and Associate Professor (with Habilitation) of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Lisbon, Portugal. He did his PhD (1998-2002) with Dr. Mike Owen at The London Research Institute (Cancer Research UK), and trained as a post-doc (2002-2005) with Prof. Adrian Hayday at King’s College London. He returned to Portugal in 2006 to establish a molecular immunology laboratory at IMM. His research is mostly dedicated to gamma-delta T lymphocytes and their key roles in immunity to infection and cancer. His projects range from the development of these cells in the thymus, to their functions upon infection or tumour challenge. He has made major contributions to the understanding of gamma-delta T cell differentiation (Silva-Santos et al. Science 2005; Ribot et al. Nature Immunol 2009; Schmolka et al. Nature Immunol 2013; Munoz-Ruiz et al. Nature Immunol 2016) and response to tumours (Correia et al. Blood 2011; Rei et al. PNAS 2014; Silva-Santos et al. Nature Rev Immunol 2015; Almeida et al. Clin Cancer Res 2016) . The European Research Council (ERC) awarded him a Starting Grant in 2010 and a Consolidator Grant in 2015. He serves as editor for multiple peer-reviewed journals, including OncoImmunology, Eur J Immunology and Frontiers in Immunology, and heads the Scientific Council of Lymphact SA, a biotech company focused on cancer immunotherapy.

Franco Locatelli

Franco Locatelli

Full Professor of Pediatrics
University of Pavia
Director Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù Piazza Sant’Onofrio, 4 00165 Rome Italy

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Franco Locatelli is a Full Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pavia and Head of the Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale Bambino Gesù, Rome.

Prof. Locatelli is a well-renowned expert of haematological malignant and non-malignant leads the largest programme of treatment of childhood cancers in Italy. Professor Locatelli has provided seminal contributions in the study of innate immunity, immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation, tumour immunology, induction of tolerance towards alloantigens and anti-viral cellular immunity in childhood malignancies.

In 2006, he received the Gold Medal for merit in public health by the President of the Italian Republic.

Prof. Locatelli is the co-author of more than 500 peer-reviewed articles published in international Journals with more than 33.000 overall citations and he has an overall H-Index of 90.

Prof. Locatelli is an Associate Editor and a reviewer ad hoc many Journals, including The Lancet, Blood, Leukaemia, Haematologica,.

Alberto Mantovani copie

Dimitry Gabrilovich

Dmitry I. Gabrilovich, MD, PhD
Christopher M. Davis Professor in Cancer Research,
Program Leader, Translational Tumor Immunology,
The Wistar Institute,
Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine,
Perelman School of Medicine,
University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia

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Dmitry Gabrilovich, MD, Ph.D., is currently a Christopher M. Davis Professor in Cancer Research and Program Leader, Translational Tumor Immunology at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.
He and his co-workers are investigating abnormalities in immune responses in cancer and therapeutic approaches to regulation of tumor microenvironment. Dr. Gabrilovich was one of the first investigators who demonstrated the defects in the function of dendritic cells in cancer. He is one of the pioneers in discovering that murine and human myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a significant role in the suppression of anti-tumor immune responses. His current research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of tumor-associated immunosuppression and on the development of new and effective cancer vaccines. Dr. Gabrilovich has more than 200 peer-reviewed publications.

Elisabeth Murchison

Elisabeth Murchison

Elizabeth Murchison, Ph.D.
Reader in Comparative Oncology and Genetics Wellcome Trust Investigator Department of Veterinary Medicine University of Cambridge
Madingley Road Cambridge CB3 0ES United Kingdom

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Elizabeth Murchison is Reader in Comparative Oncology and Genetics at the University of Cambridge, Department of Veterinary Medicine. Her laboratory, the Transmissible Cancer Group, studies the genetics, evolution and host interactions of clonally transmissible cancers in dogs and Tasmanian devils.

Elizabeth grew up in Tasmania and performed her undergraduate studies in genetics and biochemistry at the University of Melbourne. She subsequently joined the graduate programme at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, and was awarded her PhD there in 2007. After a period at the Australian National University, in 2009 she was awarded an Australian government postdoctoral fellowship to join the Cancer Genome Project at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. At Sanger, she was involved in sequencing the genome of the Tasmanian devil and its transmissible cancer. She started her laboratory at the University of Cambridge in 2013, and in 2014 she was awarded a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award to support her research.

Elizabeth was the recipient of a 2009 L’Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science Fellowship, and the 2012 Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators. In 2012 she was awarded an MRC Jewellery Heirloom as part of scheme to recognise the contributions of female life scientists and science communicators. She was selected to present the 2014 Genetics Society Balfour Prize Lecture. In 2014 she was awarded the BACR-AstraZeneca Frank Rose Award for young cancer researchers, and she was the recipient of the 2014 Cancer Research UK Future Leaders in Cancer Research award. In 2011 she delivered a TED talk entitled “Fighting a Contagious Cancer” which has been translated into 29 languages and viewed by a global audience more than 400,000 times.

Frank Kirchhoff

Frank Kirchhoff

Institute of Molecular Virology
Ulm University Medical Center
Meyerhofstrasse 1 89081 Ulm Germany

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Frank Kirchhoff studied Biology at the University of Göttingen. From 1988 to 1991, he performed his PhD thesis describing a novel HIV-2 strain under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Gerhard Hunsmann at the German Primate Center. Subsequently, he performed a post-doc (1991-1994) in the research group of Prof- Dr. Ronald C. Desrosiers at the Harvard Medical School (Southborough, USA), with a main focus on live-attenuated AIDS vaccines and the function of the accessory Nef protein of primate lentiviruses. In 1994 he moved back to Germany and established his own research group at the Institute of Virology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg under the Directorship of Prof. Dr. Bernhard Fleckenstein. In 2001 he was awarded a full professorship in Virology at the University of Ulm and became director of the newly funded Institute of Molecular Virology in Ulm in 2009. One of his main research interests is to elucidate how primate lentiviruses manipulate the immune system, cross species barriers and cause disease. Furthermore, he is interested in the discovery of natural human factors that play a role in viral pathogenesis and transmission and in their optimization for novel therapeutic or preventive approaches.

David B. Weiner

David B. Weiner

Professor & WW Smith Chair in Cancer Research
Director Wistar Vaccine Center, Executive Vice President – The Wistar Institute,
Professor Emeritus, University of Pennsylvania 3601 Spruce Street

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David Weiner is Wistar Institute Professor & WW Smith Endowed Chair in Cancer Research, Director Vaccine Center & Executive Vice President of The Wistar Institute, Professor Emeritus and, Chair of the Gene Therapy and Vaccines Graduate Program, and member of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Weiner directs a translational research laboratory in the area of Molecular Immunology. His group is one of the pioneering research teams in establishing the field of DNA Vaccines & Immune Therapies. Important reports from his lab include the first clinical studies of DNA vaccines for HIV treatment and prevention as well as for cancer immune therapy, the early development of DNA encoded genetic adjuvants including plasmid IL-12, advances in gene optimization, advances in electroporation technologies resulting in improved gene delivery among others. His laboratories work helped revitalize the field through advancement of new synthetic DNA design + modification of EP delivery approaches resulting in potent immune induction in the clinic and the first successful Phase IIb DNA efficacy study (for HPV immune therapy) in humans. He has published more than 370 papers, multiple chapters and reviews. Dr. Weiner has received several awards and honors associated with this work, including the WW Smith Endowed Chair in Cancer – 2016, the Stone family award for Cancer Research, the Vaccine Industry Association Outstanding Academic Research Laboratory in 2015 and again in 2016, an NIH Directors Translational Research Award for advancing DNA vaccine technology in 2011. He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2011, and Fellow of International Society for Vaccines in 2012. He was honored with the Prestigious CHOP-Hilleman Lectureship in 2015. He is an active mentor for students, and fellows and is highly committed to development of the careers of young scientists.

Mario Roederer

Mario Roederer

Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIH

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Mario Roederer, Ph.D., is a Senior Investigator at the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Health. He leads the ImmunoTechnology Section, and also directs the Flow Cytometry Core and the Nonhuman Primate Immunogenicity Core. Dr. Roederer has a BS in Chemistry from Harvey Mudd College, a PhD in Cell Biology from Carnegie Mellon, and postdoctoral training with Dr. Leonard Herzenberg at Stanford University. He has co-authored eight patents, five software titles in world-wide use, and more than 300 papers with over 35,000 citations.
His research combines advanced technology development in the setting of single cell analysis (integrating both flow cytometry and transcriptomics), with basic T and B cell immunology. Over the past two decades, he led the effort to the develop the state-of-the-art 30+ color flow cytometry. Basic research projects include T cell dynamics during HIV or SIV infection; the definition of the complete repertoire of functions of elicited by vaccines and pathogens; defining the genetic and environmental influence on immune homeostasis; mucosal delivery of vaccines for use in influenza, RSV, and TB; and understanding the antigenic heterogeneity of HIV/SIV Env to develop protective antibodies.

Silvia Della Bella

Silvia Della Bella

1. University of Milan – Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine
2. Humanitas Clinical and Research Center – Lab of Clinical and Experimental Immunology

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Silvia Della Bella, MD, PhD, is Associate Professor in General Pathology and Immunology at
the University of Milan, where from 2001 to 2011 she directed the Lab of Immunology at
DiSTeB, devoted to the development of methods for the analysis of human immune cells and
to student formation and training. In 2011 she moved to BioMeTra at Humanitas Clinical and
Research Center.
She is Secretary of the European Society for Clinical cell Analysis (ESCCA) since 2014 and
she has been member of the Standing Committee on teaching and education of the same
Society since 2012. She has been member of the Executive Board of the Italian Society of
Clinical and Experimental Cytometry (SICiCS) (2005-2010).
Her research is now mainly focused on the biology of human endothelial progenitor cells in
human health and disease. Her ongoing studies in this field include optimization of methods for
the detection, isolation and culture of endothelial progenitor cells in human peripheral blood,
and characterization of these cells in physiological and pathological conditions by flow
cytometric, molecular and functional approaches. Other reasearch interests include
interactions between immune cells and vascular endothelium, and immunobiology of human
dendritic cells. She is author of more than 60 papers (h-index: 21) and more than 120
communications in national and international meetings.

Ido Amit

Edoardo Fiorillo

Istituto di Ricerca Genetica e Biomedica (IRGB), CNR, Monserrato, 09042, Italy

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Edoardo Fiorillo has been interested in the aetiology of autoimmune disease since the very first time he spent in the lab, in fact, both the degree in Biology and the PhD at the University of Cagliari were focused on study of the AIRE protein, responsible for APS-1 (Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome type 1). He then, moved to Los Angeles (USC) as a postdoctoral fellow where he concentrated on TCR signaling and proteins whose involvement in autoimmune disease has been largely documented. He learned the fundamental approaches to carry out functional studies on autoimmune-related proteins and he focused on the Lymphoid protein phosphatase, Lyp, encoded by the PTPN22 gene. In 2008 he returned to Italy and he soon had the chance to start a scientific collaboration with Francesco Cucca that has led to the ProgeNIA cohort immunophenotyping project.
Shortly after the beginning of this project, he became a researcher at CNR-Institute for Genetic and Biomedical Research IRGB and he is one of the coordinator of the work focused on the genetic bases of quantitative variation of the immune system, highlighting diverse specific cell types, whose variations in numbers represents risk factors for common immune-related diseases (Orrù et al, Cell 2013). He currently holds the position of scientific manager of the IRGB-CNR Unit of Operative Support of Lanusei.

Robert Balderas

Ido Amit

Ido Amit

Assistant Professor at the Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

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Ido Amit is an Assistant Professor at the Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science.
During his PhD, Amit used systems biology approaches to study cancer in a way that integrated classical biochemistry and genomics in order to understand the way tumours develop. His Postdoctoral research at the Broad institute has shown how regulatory networks of genes and chromatin control immune response. In the last 4 years, using single cell analysis and advanced genomic methods, Amit and colleagues were able to provide a comprehensive model of chromatin and gene dynamics in blood development and immune regulation. Among others, he is a recipient of a Starting Scientist Award by the European Research Council, has received the Ernest and Bonnie Beutler Research Program of Excellence in Genomic Medicine and the 2015 EMBO Gold Medal for his work to reveal the function of the immune system.

Charles Dinarello

Charles Dinarello

Professor of Medicine and Immunology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Professor of Experimental Medicine at Radboud University in the Netherlands

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Charles A. Dinarello is Professor of Medicine and Immunology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Professor of Experimental Medicine at Radboud University in the Netherlands. Dr. Dinarello received his medical degree from Yale University, clinical training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and from 1971 77, he was at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Dr. Dinarello is considered one of the founding fathers of cytokines. He was the first to identify the two interleukin 1 molecules (IL 1α and IL 1β) in 1974, to purify IL 1β in 1977 and identified IL 1α in 1974 and reported the first cDNA for IL 1β in 1984. He has published over 700 original research articles and 250 reviews and book chapters on inflammatory cytokines, particularly on IL 1, the IL 1 family and related cytokines. The Institute for Scientific Information listed Dinarello as the world’s 4th most-cited scientist during the 20 years 1983-2002 and from 1996 to 2011, he was listed as one of 400 of the world’s most influential biomedical researchers. Dinarello is a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences and a foreign member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. He has received honorary degrees from the University of Marseille (France), the Weizmann Institute (Israel), the University of Frankfurt (Germany) and Roosevelt University (USA), Albany Medical College (USA), Radboud University (Netherlands) and Trinity College (Ireland) and the University of Bonn (Germany). For his contributions to the field of cytokines and medicine, he received the Squibb Award (USA), Ernst Jung Prize in Medicine (Germany), Gold Medal of the Heilmeyer Society for Internal Medicine (Germany), Chirone Prize (Italian National Academy of Medicine), Carol Nachman Prize (Germany), Sheikh Hamdan bin Rashdid al Maktoum Award (United Arab Emirates), Beering Prize (USA), Albany Prize in Medical Research (USA), Crafoord Prize of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (Sweden), Paul Ehrlich Prize (Germany), Bonfils-Stanton Prize (USA), the Novartis Prize in Clinical Immunology (Switzerland), the Bonazinga Award (USA), Lifetime Achievement Award of the Eicosanoid Foundation and the Drexel Prize in Immunology.

Dr. Dinarello donates the monies from his awards and prizes to The Interleukin Foundation, a charitable foundation he established in 2009, which supports research on cytokines, particularly to young investigators.

Dan Kastner

Dan Kastner

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EDUCATION/TRAINING (Begin with baccalaureate or other initial professional education, such as nursing, and include postdoctoral training.)
INSTITUTION AND LOCATION DEGREE
(if applicable)
YEAR(s) FIELD OF STUDY
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ A.B., summa cum laude 1973 Philosophy
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Ph.D. 1979 Microbiology and Immunology
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX M.D., with honor 1982 Medicine

Employment
1982-1984 Medical Residency, Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine
1985 Chief Resident in Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine
1985-1987 Medical Staff Fellow in Rheumatology, National Institute of Arthritis, Diabetes, and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda MD
1987-1990 Arthritis Foundation Fellow, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
(NIAMS), Bethesda, MD
1990-1993 Senior Staff Fellow, Arthritis and Rheumatism Branch (ARB), NIAMS, NIH
1993-2001 Senior Investigator, ARB, NIAMS, NIH
2001-2009 Chief, Genetics and Genomics Branch, NIAMS, NIH
2009-2010 Chief, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, NIAMS, NIH
2005-2010 Clinical Director and Director of Translational Research, NIAMS, NIH
2008-2011 Deputy Director for Intramural Clinical Research, NIH
2010-present Scientific Director, NHGRI

Other Experience and Professional Memberships
1983 Medical Licensure, Texas
1985 Diplomate, American Board of Internal Medicine
1988 Member, American Association of Immunologists
1989 Member, American College of Rheumatology
1990 Diplomate, Subspecialty Board in Rheumatology, American Board of Internal Medicine
1990-1991 Chair, Institutional Review Board, NIDDK/NIAMS Intramural Research Program
1994 Member, American Society of Human Genetics
1995-2010 Member, NIAMS Promotions and Tenure Panel
1998-2001 Member, NIH Central Tenure Committee
2003 Member, NIH Director’s Blue Ribbon Panel on the Future of Intramural Clinical Research
2003-2009 Tutor, NIH Clinical Research Training Program
2005-2006 Basic Science Abstract Chair, American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting
2005 Chair, Fourth International Congress on Systemic Autoinflammatory Diseases
2005-2009 Chair, NIAMS Title 42 Review Committee
2006-2010 Member, NIDDK/NIAMS Institutional Review Board
2006-2011 Member, NIH Advisory Board for Clinical Research
2008-2011 Chair, Intramural Clinical Research Steering Committee, NIH
2003-present Member, NIAMS Title 42 Review Committee
2008-present NIH Compensation Committee
2008-present NIH Clinical Compensation Panel
2010-present Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Scleroderma Research Foundation

Honors
1969 National Merit Scholarship, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
1973 Alexander Guthrie McCosh Prize in Philosophy, Princeton, NJ
1981 Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
1982 Outstanding Student in Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
1985 Henry D McIntosh Award to the Outstanding Resident in Internal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine
1987 Regina S Loeb Fellowship Award, National Arthritis Foundation
1995 Election to the American Society of Clinical Investigation
1997 Harry Heller Award, First International Congress on Familial Mediterranean Fever
1999 NIH Director’s Award
2000 Paul Klemperer Award, New York Academy of Medicine
2000 Lee C. Howley, Sr. Prize for Research in Arthritis, National Arthritis Foundation
2001 NIAMS Mentoring Award
2002 Charles W. Thomas Lecture, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University
2003 Ann Hengel Lecture in Rheumatology, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin
2003 Kroc Lecture in the Genetics of Immunity and Inflammation, The Scripps Research Institute
2003 Top Ten Arthritis Research Advances of 2003, National Arthritis Foundation
2003 US Patent 6,627,745 B1, Pyrin Gene and Mutations Thereof, which Cause Familial Mediterranean Fever
2004 Mary Jane Keller Lecture, Yale University School of Medicine
2004 Woodard Colby Memorial Lecture, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics, Minneapolis, Minnesota
2004 Dr. Morris Ziff Distinguished Lectureship, UT Southwestern Medical School
2005 Election to the Association of American Physicians
2005 American College of Rheumatology Distinguished Investigator Award
2006 Edward W. Boland Visiting Professor, The Mayo Clinic
2006 Jean S. and Ephraim P. Engleman Visiting Professor of Rheumatology, UCSF
2006 Invited Lecturer, Lowe Conference on Rheumatic Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham
2007 Promotion to NIH Distinguished Investigator
2009 James J. Lane Lectureship, University of Washington School of Medicine
2009 Herman Beerman Lectureship, Society for Investigative Dermatology
2009 Astute Clinician Lectureship, National Institutes of Health
2009 Top Ten Arthritis Research Advances of 2009, National Arthritis Foundation
2010 Election to the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
2010 Lewis Cogen Memorial Lectureship, Maine Medical Center
2010 Seebohm Lectureship in Allergy, University of Iowa
2011 Walter Bauer Lectureship in Rheumatology, Massachusetts General Hospital
2011 Sc.D., honoris causa, Elmezzi Graduate School of Molecular Medicine
2011 Harrison Society Visiting Professorship in Medicine, Vanderbilt University
2012 Ernest Beutler Lectureship, The Scripps Research Institute
2012 NIH Director’s Award
2012 Great Teachers Lectureship, NIH Clinical Center
2012 Election to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies
2013 Henry Kunkel Lectureship, The Henry Kunkel Society
2013 Keynote Lecture, FASEB Conference on Autoimmunity
2014 David Trentham Lectureship, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston
2014 Convergence Day Lectureship, UT Southwestern Medical School
2014 Rufus Cole Lectureship, The Rockefeller University

Mariana Kaplan

Mariana Kaplan

Mariana J. Kaplan, M.D.
Senior Investigator,
Chief, Systemic Autoimmunity Branch,
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases,
National Institutes of Health

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Mariana Kaplan, M.D., is Chief of the Systemic Autoimmunity Branch at the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. Prior to her appointment, she was Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Kaplan obtained her medical degree at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and did her Internal Medicine Residency at the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City. Dr. Kaplan did her Rheumatology Fellowship and postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan.

Dr. Kaplan’s research has focused on identifying mechanisms of organ damage and premature vascular disease in systemic autoimmunity. More specifically, she investigates how innate immunity (in particular, type I interferons and myeloid cells) promote end-organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and other systemic autoimmune diseases. Recently, her research has focused on identifying abnormalities of neutrophil subsets and the role of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which may contribute to the development of autoimmune responses and to end-organ damage. Dr. Kaplan also has an interest in identifying novel therapeutic targets that may prevent premature vascular damage in systemic autoimmunity, as well as the role of environmental triggers in the induction of autoimmunity. Moreover, she has led clinical trials to identify mechanisms that reduce blood vessel dysfunction in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders.

In addition to her research activities, Dr. Kaplan is an active clinician and teacher. She sees lupus patients in the NIH Clinical Research Center and is involved in the development of various clinical trials for patients with autoimmune diseases at NIH. She has served in various roles at the American College of Rheumatology/ Rheumatology Research Foundation, the American Association of Immunologists, the Journal of Immunology, and the Lupus Foundation of America. She was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and received the Henry Kunkel Young Investigator Award and the Edmund L. Dubois Memorial Lectureship, both from the American College of Rheumatology. Dr. Kaplan received the 2015 Evelyn V. Hess Award from the Lupus Foundation of America in recognition of her significant contributions to lupus research, diagnosis, and treatment.

Alberto Martini

Alberto Martini

Scientific Director, G Gaslini Institute, Genoa, Italy

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Alberto Martini is Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Genoa and has been Director of Pediatria II Reumatologia (EULAR Centre of Excellence in Rheumatology 2008-18) and of the Department of Pediatrics of the G Gaslini Institute, Genoa, Italy. Since March 2016 he is the Scientific Director of the G Gaslini Institute in Genoa. (albertomartini@gaslini.org).

Prof Martini is Chairman of the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trial Organization (PRINTO) and has been President of the Paediatric Rheumatology European Society (2011-16), Chairman of the EULAR Standing Committee on Paediatric Rheumatology (2013-16) and President of the Italian Council of Academic Professor of Paediatrics (2008-2012).
He is Co-Editor of Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology and Pediatric Rheumatology and member of the Editorial board of Annals of Rheumatic Diseases

Prof Martini is author of more than 400 papers in peer reviewed journals related to paediatric rheumatic diseases.

Yenan Bryceson

Yenan Bryceson

Department of Medicine
Karolinska Institutet
Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge

Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine (HERM)
Novum (4th floor) Hälsovägen 7 SE-14157 Huddinge SWEDEN

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Yenan Bryceson is a Principal Investigator at the Center for Hematology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Sweden. He also holds guest professorship the Broegelmann Laboratory, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Bergen, Norway. Following undergraduate training at the University of Oslo, Norway, he obtained his PhD from a graduate partnership program between the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Sweden in 2008, mentored by Eric Long and Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren. He established his own laboratory in 2011, in part funded by grants from the Swedish Research Council as well as a Starting Grant from the European Research Council (ERC).

Dr Bryceson’s research is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte cytotoxicity in infection and cancer. His research is mostly dedicated to understanding cytotoxic lymphocyte recognition and elimination of target cells, including their differentiation and effector responses. He has contributed to the understanding of how distinct NK cell receptors cooperate in order to induce target cell killing and how adaptive NK cell subsets are epigenetically imprinted and functionally specialized following viral infection. His research has focused on how defects in cytotoxic lymphocytes are related to human immunodeficiency disorders, with a particular emphasis on hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and related syndromes.

Min Ae Lee-Kirsch

Min Ae Lee-Kirsch

Prof. Dr. med. Min Ae Lee-Kirsch
Department of Pediatrics
Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus
Technische Universität Dresden,
Dresden, Germany

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Min Ae Lee-Kirsch, M.D. is of professor of molecular pediatrics at Children´s Hospital, TU Dresden. She studied medicine in Heidelberg, Boston and Oxford. She completed her postdoctoral training and a fellowship in genetics at Harvard Medical School. Prof. Lee-Kirsch is Board certified in Clinical Molecular Genetics and runs the molecular diagnostic laboratory at Children´s Hospital, TU Dresden. Her scientific work focuses on genetic and molecular investigations of autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders caused by defects of the innate immune system.

Connie Weyand

Connie Weyand

Professor of Medicine
Chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology

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Cornelia M. Weyand, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine and the Chief of the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Weyand’s career as a physician–scientist began at the Mayo Clinic when she joined the faculty of the Mayo Medical and Graduate School in Rochester, Minnesota, as an Assistant Professor in 1990. In 2000, Dr. Weyand became the Barbara Woodward Lips Professor of Medicine and Immunology at Mayo Medical and Graduate School and from 2001-2004 she directed the Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapeutics Program in the Department of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic. In 2004, Dr. Weyand moved to Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, where she held the David C. Lowance Chair in Medicine and was the Director of the Lowance Center for Human Immunology and Rheumatology.

Since the early 1990s, she has led a research team in translational immunology supported continuously through funding from the National Institute of Health. Dr. Weyand has had a special interest in tissue-damaging immune responses in rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and large vessel vasculitis. She and her collaborators have established several preclinical models, including a chimera model in which human synovial tissue and human blood vessels are engrafted into immunodeficient mice. In these model systems, Dr. Weyand’s research team has defined the role of T cells and dendritic cells in deviating from protective to destructive immunity. Over the last decade, she has devoted special emphasis to the remodeling of the immune system with aging, how chronic disease ages the immune system, and how aged immune cells cause inflammation. She has defined molecular defects underlying the premature aging process in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, implicating deficiencies in telomerase and the DNA damage sensor Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) in T cell dysfunction. Together with her fellows and students, Dr. Weyand has identified and characterized immune cells that mediate medium vessel vasculitis and has defined the molecular underpinnings of the immunostromal interactions that cause arterial inflammation.

Dr. Weyand has authored more than 350 manuscripts and delivered more than 260 invited presentations around the world; including more than 20 named lectures. She is an editor on two textbooks and has contributed more than 40 book chapters on vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Weyand has served as a mentor to more than 100 students and fellows, many of whom have pursued a career as physician-investigators. She has received numerous awards and honors including the Henry Christian Award for Excellence in Research, the Henry Kunkel Young Investigator Award, the Carol Nachmann Award for Rheumatology, the Mayo Foundation Department of Medicine Outstanding Investigator Award, the Emory University School of Medicine Outstanding Research Citation Award, and the Paul Klemperer Award from the New York Academy of Medicine.

Ridha Barbouche

Luigi Naldini

Professore Ordinario di Istologia
Direttore Istituto Telethon San Raffaele per la Terapia Genica, Milano
Direttore Divisione Medicina Rigenerativa Divisione di Medicina Rigenerativa, Cellule Staminali e Terapia Genica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano
Membro del Comitato Tecnico Scientifico per la Ricerca dell’Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele

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Curriculum Vitae

  • dal Dicembre 2011: Direttore della Divisione di Medicina Rigenerativa, Cellule Staminali e Terapia Genica, Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele, Milano.
  • dal Ottobre 2008: Direttore Istituto Telethon San Raffaele per la Terapia Genica, Milano
  • dal 2003: Professore di I fascia di Istologia e di Terapia Genica e Cellulare, Università Vita Salute San Raffaele,
  • 2003-2008 Codirettore Istituto Telethon San Raffaele per la Terapia Genica, Milano;
  • 2002-1998 Professore Associato, Università di Torino e Direttore del Laboratorio di Terapia Genica, Istituto per la Ricerca e Cura del Cancro, Candiolo (Torino);
  • 1998-1996 Senior Scientist e Direttore del Progetto Vettori Lentivirali, Cell Genesys, Foster City, California;
  • 1996-1994 Visiting Scientist, Laboratorio di Genetica (Direttore: Prof. Inder Verma), Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California;
  • 1996-1990 Ricercatore Universitario, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche ed Oncologia dell’Università di Torino;
  • 1989-1987 Post-doctoral training con J. Schlessinger (Rockville, M.D. and King of Prussia, PA);
  • 1987-1983 Dottorato di Ricerca in Scienze Citologiche e Morfogenetiche con P.M. Comoglio, Università di Torino;
  • 1983 Laurea in Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Torino.

Attività Scientifiche

All’inizio della sua carriera di ricercatore Luigi Naldini ha identificato “Hepatocyte Growth Factor” come il ligando del recettore Met, ne ha comprovato l’identità con lo “Scatter Factor” e ne ha chiarito il meccanismo di regolazione e la funzione nel promuovere la motilità e l’invasione delle cellule epiteliali. Da allora MET e’ stato uno degli oncogeni piu’studiati nei tumori epiteliali e nella formazione di metastasi.
Durante il suo periodo di ricerca presso i laboratori di Inder Verma e Didier Trono al Salk Institute di La Jolla (1994-96), ha ideato i primi vettori lentivirali ibridi derivati da HIV e ne ha dimostrato l’utilizzo per il trasferimento genico all’interno di cellule non proliferanti. La pubblicazione originale che riporta i risultati di questo lavoro e’ uno degli articoli piu’ citati della rivista Science (oltre 2.700 citazioni). In seguito ha affinato la tecnologia dei vettori per un suo utilizzo più sicuro ed efficace lavorando come senior scientist presso la Cell Genesys di Foster City, California. Nel 1998 ha assunto il ruolo di Professore Associato di Istologia all’Universita’ di Torino e la direzione del Laboratorio di trasferimento genico presso l’Istituto di Ricerca e Cura del Cancro di Torino; nel 2003 si e’ trasferito a Milano presso l’ Istituto San Raffaele Telethon per la Terapia Genica di cui e’ stato prima co-direttore e dal ottobre 2008 direttore.Il laboratorio di Luigi Naldini e’ stato a lungo in prima linea nello sviluppo delle strategie di trasferimento genico ed ha utilizzato le nuove tecnologie per raggiungere nuove acquisizioni in processi biologici fondamentali di alta rilevanza per la medicina molecolare, quali l’attivita’ delle cellule staminali e l’angiogenesi.
La recente applicazione della regolazione dei microRNA alla espressione del vettore ha fornito una nuova strategia sperimentale in cui l’espressione del transgene puo’ essere specificamente limitata alla tipologia di cellula bersaglio desiderata ed ad un suo specifico livello di differenziazione. Utilizzando questo approccio innovativo, il gruppo di Luigi Naldini ha potuto superare la barriera immunologica, uno dei principali ostacoli per una efficace terapia genica ed ottenere un trasferimento genico stabile e la correzione a lungo termine dell’Emofilia B nel modello murino. Attraverso l’analisi del contributo delle cellule ematopoietiche all’angiogenesi, il lavoro di Luigi Naldini ha fornito un nuovo paradigma in cui il midollo osseo fornisce elementi a funzione paracrina fondamentali per la neoformazione vascolare. Questi studi hanno aperto la strada ad una promettente strategia attraverso cui la progenie di progenitori ematopoietici trapiantati puo’ selettivamente indirizzare la terapia genica ai tumori.
Nel settore dei disordini neurodegenerativi il lavoro di Luigi Naldini ha dimostrato che il reclutamento di cellule ematopoietiche nella popolazione microgliale dopo trapianto di progenitori emopoietici puo’ essere sfruttato per veicolare la terapia genica al sistema nervoso centrale e periferico ed ha ottenuto la prima cura efficace della leucodistrofia metacromatica nel modello murino. Un clinical trial basato sull’utilizzo di vettori lentivirali per la Leucodistrofia Metacromatica, che è invariabilmente letale e fino ad oggi priva di un trattamento efficace, è attualmente in corso presso l’Istituto Scientifico San Raffaele. Tutti i pazienti trattati mostrano livelli apprezzabilmente alti e stabili di espressione del gene terapeutico nella ricostituita ematopoiesi policlonale, con una chiara indicazione del beneficio terapeutico, poiché la malattia non si è manifestata oltre il tempo atteso in cui la stessa si è sviluppata nei fratelli non trattati. Nell’Ottobre del 2010, l’Istituto Tiget ha stretto un’alleanza strategica con GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) -il primo accordo mai raggiunto tra un’azienda farmaceutica ed un centro Accademico impegnato sul fronte della terapia genica- per rendere la terapia genica con cellule staminali ematopoietiche una realtà clinica.

Ridha Barbouche

Mohamed Ridha BARBOUCHE MD, PhD

Professor in Immunology and Assistant-Dean Research, Medical School, University of Tunis
Head, Department of Immunology, Institut Pasteur de Tunis
Vice-President, Tunisian Society of Immunology
Institut Pasteur de Tunis

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Mohamed Ridha Barbouche is Professor of Immunology and Assistant-Dean Research at the Medical School, University of Tunis. He is head of the Clinical Immunology Department and Director of a Research Laboratory at the Institut Pasteur de Tunis, Tunisia.

He received his M.D. from the University of Tunis and his Ph.D. from the University Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, France. He trained in immunology and infectious diseases at the Institut Pasteur and Hôpital Necker-Enfants Malades in Paris. He was post-doctoral fellow at Cornell University in New York.

His clinical activity interests are focused on the advanced immunological and genetic investigation as well as the care and genetic counseling for primary immune-deficiencies’ patients. His research activity is dedicated to the study of the molecular basis of these primary immune-deficiencies as a model for the study of genetic susceptibility to infections in humans and the identification of new immunological pathways and their role in host defense against pathogens, particularly mycobacteria. This research is supported by grants from NIAID/NIH, WHO/TDR, European Commission, Pasteur Institutes Network and Tunisian Ministry for Scientific Research and Technology.

He is member of the Scientific Boards of the Institut Pasteur de Tunis and the Medical School, University of Tunis. He is founder member, former Secretary General and current Vice-President of the Tunisian Society of Immunology as well as member of the scientific board of the Federation of African Immunology Societies and founder member of the African Society for Immunodeficiencies. He is board member of the Education Committee of International Unio n of Immunological Societies.

He has produced research work on Immunology, including autoimmunity, immune-deficiencies and immunity to infections, 87 peer reviewed publications.

Alain Fischer

Alain Fischer

Malika Tiouiri-Sifouane
Assistante Pr Alain Fischer
Gestionnaire INSERM UMR 1163
Fondation Imagine
24 Boulevard du Montparnasse – 75015 Paris

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Dr Alain Fischer studied medicine, with a specialization in pediatrics and immunology at the Université of Paris. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the University College London, he started independent research in an INSERM unit at the Necker Hospital in Paris. Since 2009, he is the director of the Institute for Genetic Diseases (Imagine) at Necker University Hospital (75015 – Paris). Dr Fischer also served as a professor of pediatric immunology at the Université Paris Descartes. From 1996 to 2012, he has served as the director of the pediatric immunology department at the Necker Hospital. Dr Fischer is presently Professor at College de France. Dr Fischer’s main research interests are gene therapy, primary immunodeficiency diseases, and the development of the lymphoid system. Dr Fischer received the Louis Jeantet Prize for Medicine in 2001 and the Japan Prize 2015.

Gioacchino Natoli

Gioacchino Natoli

Principal Investigator
European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Department of Experimental Oncology
IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, I-20139 Milan

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DEGREE
Medical Doctor with honors, University of Rome, La Sapienza (24/7/1991). Thesis title: Activation of
cellular proto-oncogenes by the Hepatitis B virus X protein and its role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular
carcinoma.

EDUCATION
1991-October 1997 Residency in Internal Medicine (1st Post-graduate School of
Internal Medicine, Univ. of Rome, La Sapienza).
1985-1991 School of Medicine, Univ. of Rome, La Sapienza).

RESEARCH TRAINING
1998-June2000 Post-doctoral fellow in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology
and Transcriptional Regulation, Dept. of Pharmacology,
UCSD (Chief: Prof. Michael Karin)
1991-1997 Graduate student in the Laboratory of
Genetic Expression, Institute of I Clinica Medica, Univ.
of Rome La Sapienza (Chief: Prof. Massimo Levrero).
1986-1990 Undergraduate Student in the Institute of
Histology of the Univ. of Rome La Sapienza (Chief:
Prof. Michela Galdieri).

RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
September 2005-present:
Group Leader, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
June 2000-August 2005:
Group Leader, Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB), Bellinzona, Switzerland

CURRENT AND PAST RESEARCH TOPICS
Epigenetic and transcriptional control of inflammation. Transcriptional regulation of inflammatory and
cancer-related genes activated by transcription factors of the NF-kB/Rel family. Inflammatory
cytokine signal transduction. Signaling through receptors for bacterial components. Viral hepatitis and
hepatocellular carcinoma.

MAIN AWARDS AND GRANTS
2013 EMBO member
2011-2016 European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant
2009 Chiara D’Onofrio prize for Italian researchers below 43 y.
2007-2010 Marie Curie Excellence Grant (TRANS-TAR: targeting
transcriptional mechanisms in chronic inflammationassociated
diseases)
2005-2008 Human Frontiers Science Program (HFSP), Young
Investigator Grant
2003 Roche Research Foundation
2002-2006 Swiss Federation against Cancer
2001-2005 Swiss National Science Foundation (2)
1998-2000 Long Term Fellowship for M.D./Ph.D. from the Damon
Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer Research Fund
1991 Institute Pasteur-Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti Prize for best
graduation thesis in the field of infectious diseases.

COMMISSIONS OF TRUST (SELECTED)
-From 2013: Human Frontiers Science Program (HFSP) – Fellowship Selection Committee
-From 2011: Italian Association for Research on Cancer (AIRC) – Scientific and Technical Committee
(CTS)
-From 2009: Steering Committee of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC; Oxford, Stockholm,
Toronto) – Epigenetics

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Camilla Jandus

Project leader, SNSF Ambizione Lecturer
Translational Tumor Immunology Group
Department of Fundamental Oncology
Ludwig Center for Cancer Research
University of Lausanne
Biopôle III, DB61
Chemin des Boveresses 155
CH-1066 Epalinges
Switzerland

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Camilla Jandus, MD, PhD, is project leader in the Translational tumor immunology group at the Department of Oncology of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Camilla Jandus graduated in 2003 from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Bern, Switzerland, after a training at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and the obtaining of her MD thesis from the Institute of Pathology in Bern. From 2004 to 2008 she performed her MD-PhD training at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in Lausanne, in the group of Prof P. Romero. Then, she joined for a 2-year post-doctoral training the Pharmacology Institute in Bern. In 2012, she joined as Associate Investigator the Ludwig Center for Cancer Research at the University of Lausanne. Since October 2015, supported by a prestigious Ambizione Fellowship from the Swiss National Science Foundation, she is a project leader at the Department of Oncology of the University of Lausanne.

Dr Jandus main scientific interest is in the study of T cell- and Innate Lymphoid Cell (ILC)- mediated immune responses to human tumors. She has been involved in the immune monitoring of several peptide-based clinical trials in melanoma patients and was among the first to use peptide-MHC class II multimers to characterize tumor-specific CD4 T cells in patients, directly ex-vivo. Her current focus is in the functional, phenotypical and T Cell Receptor (TCR) characterization of large panels of human tumor-specific CD4 T cell clones for adoptive cell transfer therapy in cancer patients (TCR gene therapy using autologous lymphocytes). In parallel, she is investigating the role of Innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subsets, a recently described family of innate immune effector cells, in the context of anti-tumor immunity. In particular, she is developing strategies to exploit ILCs to modulate the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment and favour tumor eradication.

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Robert C. Gallo, M.D.

Director
The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
Institute of Human Virology at the
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Co-founder and Scientific Director, Global Virus Network

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Since 1996, Dr. Robert C. Gallo has been Director of the Institute of Human Virology and Professor of Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is also currently Co-Founder and Scientific Director of the Global Virus Network (GVN). Previously (for 30 years) he was at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD. Dr. Gallo’s career long interest has followed these themes: the study of the basic biology of human blood cells, their normal and abnormal growth, and the causes of abnormal growth whether excessive, e.g., leukemias or insufficient, e.g., immune deficiencies and the involvement of viruses in these abnormalities.
Dr. Gallo and his co-workers opened and pioneered the field of human retrovirology when in 1980 they discovered the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1) and with others showed it was a cause of a particular form of human leukemia. (This was the first, and to date, the only known human leukemia virus and one of the few known viruses shown to cause a human cancer). A year later he and his group discovered the second known human retrovirus (HTLV-2). Dr. Gallo and his colleagues also independently discovered HIV (the 3rd known human retrovirus), and provided the first results to show that HIV was the cause of AIDS. They also developed the lifesaving HIV blood test (1983- 1984). Earlier (1978) Gallo discovered a variant of gibbon ape leukemia virus (Hall’s Island strain) which causes T-cell leukemia.
The discoveries of all human retroviruses, including HIV, were to a great extent dependent on being able to grow human T-cells (lymphocytes) in the laboratory, and this was achieved by the use of a growth factor called Interleukin-2 or IL-2. Dr. Gallo and his co-workers discovered Interleukin-2 in 1976, thus setting the stage for all groups to culture human T-cells. Today IL-2 is used not only in laboratory experiments, but also in some therapies for cancer and AIDS. Gallo and co-workers also spent several years in the 1970ies working out detailed biochemical and immunological characteristics of human cellular DNA polymerases alpha, beta, and gamma as well as reverse transcriptase (RT) from several retroviruses in order to use RT as a sensitive and specific surrogate marker for retroviruses. It was particularly essential to distinguish the mitochondrial DNA polymerase (DNA pol. gamma) from RT because of their similar biochemical characteristics which led to many prior false claims for detecting human retroviruses.
In 1995 he and his colleagues discovered the first natural (endogenous) inhibitors of HIV, namely some of the beta chemokines. This discovery helped in the later discovery of the HIV co-receptor, CCR5, and opened up entire new approaches to treatment of HIV disease.
Also, Dr. Gallo, along with his colleague, D. Ablashi, discovered in 1986 the first new human herpes in more than twenty-five years, Human Herpes Virus-6 (HHV-6). This is now known to cause Roseola in infants and is a candidate for involvement in several other diseases.
Currently, Dr. Gallo and his team receive significant funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Institutes of Health for a promising HIV preventive vaccine candidate.

Main Recognition

Dr. Gallo has been awarded 34 honorary doctorates from universities in the United States, China, Sweden, Italy, Israel, Peru, Germany, Belgium, Mexico, Argentina, Spain, Ireland, Jamaica and Greece. He is a member of numerous professional and honorary societies including the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Society of Medicine (Glasgow, Scotland), the Royal Society of Medicine (Brussels, Belgium), the Royal College of Physicians (Ireland) 2007, among several others, and a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame.
He has received numerous major scientific honors and awards, for example uniquely the most prestigious U.S. award, the Albert Lasker Prize awarded twice (1982, 1986), General Motors Cancer Research Prize 1984, American Cancer Society Medal of Honor Award (1983), Gairdner Foundation International Award (Canada) 1987, The Japan Prize of Science and Technology (1988), Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize (Germany) 1999, Principe de Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research (Spain) 2000, the World Health Award from President Gorbachev in Vienna in November 2001, the first Otto Herz Memorial Award for Basic Research on Malignant Processes (Israel) 1982, Hebrew University’s Rabbi Shai Shacknai Memorial Price (Israel) 1985, the Tata Memorial Centre’s Birla International Award (India) 1986, the Tevere Roma International Award (Italy) 1985, the Harvard Medical School Warren Alpert Foundation Award (1998), Israel’s top prize, the Dan David Award (2009), and the Paul G. Rogers Medical Science Award of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (2010). The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professorship in Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine (2013).
Dr. Gallo was the most cited scientist in the world 1980-1990, according to the Institute for Scientific Information (Science July 27, 1990, p. 358), and he was ranked third in the world for scientific impact for the period 1983-2002 (PNAS, November 15, 2005, vol102, no.46, 6569-16572). He has published close to 1,200 papers.

J. Miguel López-Botet Arbona

Full Professor Full Professor at the Univ. Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Barcelona),
Director of IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute) and Head of the Immunology Service.

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Education / Training

Degree Institution Year(s)
M.D. Univ. de Valencia 1971-1977
Ph.D. Univ. Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) 1979-1982
Medical Resident in Immunology Hospital Puerta de Hierro (UAM) 1979-1982

Professional academic positions

Dates (from-until) Position Department & Institution
1983-1985 Postdoctoral fellow Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Lausanne
1985-2000 Staff member Dept. of Immunology, Hospital de la Princesa (UAM)
1987-1999 Assistant Professor Univ. Autónoma de Madrid (UAM)
2000- Full Professor of Immunology Univ. Pompeu Fabra (Dpt. Health and Experimental Sciences)
2006- Scientific Director IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)
2007- Head Immunology Service (Hospital del Mar)

Honours and other professional activies

Management

  • President of the Research Committee. University Hospital La Princesa. Madrid (1988-91). Coordination of the
    Research Unit development.
  • Research and teaching coordinator. Responsible of the Research Unit. University Hospital La Princesa (December
    1995- September 1996).
  • President of the Research Committee. University Hospital La Princesa (1996-1998).
  • Member of the National Immunology Committee (Ministry of Health) (designated by S.E.I. 1998-1999)
  • Secretary of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS-UPF) (September 2001- June 2002)
  • Director of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS-UPF) (June 2002-May 2004)
  • Member of the Scientific Committee of the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park Foundation (PRBB) (2002-2004;
    2007-)
  • Coordinator of the Immunology Unit (DCEXS-UPF) (2000- )
  • Member of the Advisory Committee for Research an Innovation in Health (Generalitat de Catalunya) (2011-)

Scientific Societies

  • Member of: Spanish Society for Immunology (SEI); American Association of Immunologists (AAI); Spanish Society of
    Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEAIC); Society for Natural Immunity (SNI); Henry Kunkel Society (HKS).
  • Vice President of the Spanish Society for Immunology (1996-1999).
  • President of the Spanish Society for Immunology (2004-2008).
  • President of the Society for Natural Immunity (2005-2008)

Teaching:

  • Immunology courses for undergraduate and PhD students. UAM (1987-1999)
  • Immunology course for undergraduate students UPF (2000- )
  • International Master and PhD Program. UPF (2003-)

Clinical duties

Staff responsible of diagnostic laboratories (Autoimmunity and Cellular Immunology). Immunology Service.
University Hospital la Princesa. (1985-1999)

Project reviewer

FIS-ISCIII (Ministry of Health), ANEP, MEC (Ministry of Education and Science), Wellcome Trust (UK),
Medical Research Council (UK), Telethon (Italy), AIRC (Italy), INSERM (France), ANR (France).

Francesco Annunziato

Socio ordinario della Società Italiana di Immunologia, Immunologia Clinica e Allergologia (SIICA).

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Curriculum

  • 1994: si laurea in Scienze Biologiche presso l’Università degli Studi di Firenze discutendo una tesi sperimentale dal titolo “Ruolo delle cellule Th1 e Th2 nell’attivazione policlonale B in corso di infezione da HIV”.
  • 1994: risulta vincitore di una borsa di studio triennale assegnata dall’Associazione Italiana per la Ricerca sul Cancro (AIRC) presentando un progetto di ricerca dal titolo “Linfociti Th1 e Th2: loro ruolo in fisiologia e nella risposta anti-tumorale”.
  • 1995: risulta vincitore di un premio per la migliore comunicazione orale presso il XIV congresso nazionale della Società Italiana di Immunologia e Immunopatologia.
  • 1995: sostiene e supera l’esame di Stato per l’abilitazione all’esercizio della professione di biologo e risulta regolarmente iscritto all’ Albo Nazionale dei Biologi dal 1996.
  • 1996: frequenta uno “stage” di studio presso l’Università di Colonia (Germania), ospite del Prof. Andreas Radbruch, finanziato dalla European Science Foundation (Network HLA and Allergy), al fine di perfezionare ed acquisire nuove tecniche di citofluorimetria intracitoplasmatica.
  • 1997: frequenta uno “stage” di studio e perfezionamento sulle nuove tecniche di citofluorimetria presso l’Università di Berlino (Germania), ospite del Prof. Andreas Radbruch, finanziato dalla European Science Foundation (Network HLA and Allergy).
  • 1997: frequenta uno “stage” teorico-pratico a Milano di tecniche di cell sorting mediante citometria a flusso
  • 1999: consegue il titolo di Dottore di ricerca in Immunologia Clinica, con il massimo dei voti, discutendo una tesi dal titolo ” Recettori delle chemochine ed altre molecole di superficie associate con le cellule Th1 e Th2 umane “.
  • 1999: risulta vincitore di un Assegno di Ricerca conferito dall’Università degli Studi di Firenze (area Biomedica, Istituto di Medicina Interna ed Immunoallergologia) per svolgere un progetto dal titolo ” Sistema Immunitario e difesa contro le neoplasie “.
  • 2000: frequenta uno “stage” teorico-pratico a Erembodegem (Belgio) di tecniche citofluorimetriche avanzate per analisi multiparametriche (citofluorimetro BD-LSR).
  • 2000: risulta vincitore per l’assegnazione del Premio Scientifico intitolato alla memoria del Professore G.B. Rossi per il miglior lavoro italiano pubblicato nel periodo 1999-2000 riguardante la tematica dell’infezione da HIV e le interazioni con il Sistema Immunitario (Francesco Annunziato et al. “Limited expression of R5-tropic HIV-1 in CCR5-positive Th1-polarized T cells explained by their ability to produce RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β. Blood 95(4): 1167-74. 2000)
  • 2002: il 1 Novembre entra in ruolo in qualità di Professore di seconda fascia nel settore scientifico disciplinare Med-04 (Patologia Generale) presso la facoltá di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Universitá degli Studi di Firenze.
  • 2003: entra a far parte del Comitato dei Garanti del nuovo corso di laurea specialistico in Biotecnologie mediche presso la Facoltá di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Universitá degli Studi di Firenze
  • 2004: organizza e diventa responsabile del curriculum in Medicina riparativa/rigenerativa del biennio specialistico del corso di laurea in Biotecnologie mediche presso la Facoltá di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Universitá degli Studi di Firenze
  • 2005: viene eletto membro della Giunta del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie
  • 2005: diventa “Member of the Evaluation Board for the RHEUMATOLOGY & CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY FACULTY of The Faculty of Thousand in Medicine.
  • 2008: viene eletto membro del Comitato per la didattica del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze
  • 2008: viene eletto membro del Gruppo di Autovalutazione del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze
  • 2009: entra a far parte dell’Editorial Board di European Journal of Immunology, la rivista ufficiale dell’European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS)
  • 2010: diventa direttore della S.O.D di Terapie rigenerative dell’Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, AOUC
  • 2010: diventa Review Editor in Frontiers in Pro-inflammatory Cytokines, rivista scientifica della Frontiers Research Foundation
  • 2011: viene eletto “Member of the Board of the Immunology Section of the European Accademy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)”
  • 2011: viene eletto membro della External Relations & Finance Committee del 15 International Congress of Immunology, Milano 2013
  • 2011: viene eletto Vicepresidente del Corso di Laurea Interfacoltà di Biotecnologie
  • 2012: viene eletto membro dell’Editorial Board della rivista scientifica PloS ONE
  • 2012: viene eletto membro della  Henry Kunkel Society
  • 2012: viene eletto Presidente del Corso di Laurea Interfacoltà di Biotecnologie per il quadriennio 2012-2016
  • dal 2002 a tutt’ oggi è socio ordinario della Società Italiana di Immunologia, Immunologia Clinica e Allergologia (SIICA).

ATTIVITA’ DIDATTICA

1- viene eletto membro del Comitato dei Garanti del nuovo corso di laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltá di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Universitá degli Studi di Firenze- dal 2003 a tutt’oggi
2- viene eletto membro della Giunta del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie, dal 2005 a tutt’oggi.
4- viene eletto responsabile del curriculum in Medicina riparativa/rigenerativa del biennio specialistico del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltá di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Universitá degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2004 al 2010.
5- viene eletto membro del Comitato per la didattica del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze dal 2008 a tutt’oggi.
6- viene eletto membro del Gruppo di Autovalutazione del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze dal 2008 a tutt’oggi
7- viene eletto Vicepresidente del Corso di Laurea Interfacoltà di Biotecnologie dal 2011 al 2012
8- viene eletto Presidente del Corso di Laurea Interfacoltà di Biotecnologie per il quadriennio 2012-2016

Corso di Laurea Magistrale in Medicina e Chirurgia

1- Cotitolare dell’insegnamento di “Patologia generale” del Corso di Laurea Magistrale di Medicina e Chirurgia presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2012 a tutt’oggi.

Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie

1- Titolare dell’ insegnamento di “Immunologia e tecniche immunologiche” del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2001 al 2010.
2- Titolare dell’ insegnamento di Tecniche citofluorimetriche ed immunodiagnostiche del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2001 al 2010.
3- Titolare dell’ insegnamento di “Immunologia” del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2011 a tutt’oggi.
4- Tecniche in biotecnologie e laboratorio di biotecnologie del Corso di Laurea in Biotecnologie presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2011 a tutt’oggi.

Corso di Laurea Magistrale in Biotecnologie

1- Coordinatore e cotitolare dell’ insegnamento di Tecniche di selezione, mantenimento e manipolazione di cellule staminali del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2004 al 2009.
2- Cotitolare dell’ insegnamento di Tecniche di differenziazione e caratterizzazione di cellule staminali del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2004 al 2009
3- Cotitolare dell’ insegnamento di Diagnostica in patologia vascolare del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2004 al 2012.
4- Titolare dell’ insegnamento di Tecniche immunologiche del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2004 a tutt’oggi.
5- Cotitolare dell’ insegnamento di Terapie Biologiche e cellulari in campo immunologico del Corso di Laurea Specialistico in Biotecnologie Mediche presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2010 a tutt’oggi.

Scuola di specializzazione in Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica

1- Docente della scuola di specializzazione in Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica, Medicina Interna, area disciplinare di laboratorio (A4)- dal 2001-2008.
2- Titolare dell’insegnamento di “Patologia generale” della Scuola di specializzazione in Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica presso la Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, dal 2008 a tutt’oggi

Dottorato di Ricerca

1- Docente del Dottorato di ricerca in “Medicina clinica e sperimentale” dell’ Università degli Studi di Firenze- dal 2003 a tutt’oggi.
2- Docente del Dottorato di ricerca in “Biologia ed Applicazioni Cliniche delle Cellule Staminali” dell’ Università degli Studi di Verona- dal 2005 a tutt’oggi.

Corso di Laurea in Tecnico di laboratorio biomedico

10- Cotitolare del corso integrato di insegnamento di “Immunologia e Immunoematologia” (settore F04B, Patologia Clinica) per il Corso di Laurea in Tecnico di Laboratorio Biomedico, dal 2002 al 2010.

ATTIVITA’ SCIENTIFICA

La produzione scientifica del Prof. Francesco Annunziato consiste di 95 pubblicazioni che includono lavori pubblicati su riviste internazionali.
I suoi interessi di ricerca sono rivolti verso argomenti di Allergologia, Immunologia, Oncologia, Ematologia ed altri settori fisiopatologici della Patologia generale umana. 
Tra gli studi di immunologia devono essere ricordati quelli inerenti la fisiologia delle sottopopolazioni dei linfociti T e della loro ontogenesi, la cooperazione tra i linfociti T e B umani nella risposta all’antigene, lo studio delle citochine attive sulle cellule B, gli studi di natura funzionale a livello clonale dei linfociti T e soprattutto la dimostrazione nell’uomo di cellule T ‘helper’ con differenti capacità funzionali (linfociti Th1, Th2 e Th17) e la loro modulabilità in vitro e in vivo da numerosi segnali del microambiente.
Per quanto attiene agli studi applicativi vanno ricordati i contributi originali riguardanti la fisiopatologia dell’infezione da HIV, la fisiopatologia delle malattie infiammatorie croniche a patogenesi immunologica (Asma, Dermatite Atopica, Morbo di Crohn, ecc.), fisiopatologia delle neoplasie e delle malattie linfoproliferative.

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Boro Dropulic, PhD, MBA

Chief Scientific Officer & General Manager, Lentigen Technology, Inc A Miltenyi Company

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Dr. Boro Dropulić, Ph.D., M.B.A is the Chief Science Officer and General Manager of Lentigen Technology Inc (LTI), a wholly owned subsidiary of Miltenyi Biotec GmbH. Prior to LTI, Dr Dropulic founded Lentigen Corporation in December 2004 and served as its Chief Scientific Officer and President. Previously, he was the Founder and Chief Scientific Officer at VIRxSYS Corporation, where he successfully led a multidisciplinary team to initiate and complete the first lentiviral vector clinical trial in humans. Prior to that, Dr. Dropulic was an Instructor and Adjunct Assistant Professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he was the first to develop an HIV-based vector targeted to inhibit the replication of the HIV/AIDS virus. He was previously a Fogarty Fellow at the National Institutes of Health, where he worked on developing transgenic animals using embryonic stem cell technology, understanding molecular aspects of HIV replication and gene therapy for HIV/AIDS. Dr. Dropulic obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Western Australia, focusing upon how viruses gain entry into the brain to cause encephalitis. He also holds an M.B.A. from The Johns Hopkins University and a B.Sc., with honors, from the University of Western Australia. Dr. Dropulic has served on a number of committees, including grant review committees at the NIH, EU and CIRM, and as a member and Chair of several committees for the American Society for Gene and Cell Therapy.

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Yanet Valdez, PhD

Senior Scientist
StemCell Technologies
Vancouver BC Canada

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Dr. Yanet Valdez obtained a master’s degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Cayetano Heredia in Lima, Peru. There she worked on a collaborative project between Dr. Robert Gilman of John’s Hopkins University and Dr. Douglas Berg of Washington University School of Medicine. This collaboration focused on the analysis of genetic polymorphism and drug resistance of Peruvian clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori (Hp). Her work showed that over 50% of patients carry a mixture of antibiotic resistant and susceptible strains which explains, in part, the failure of standard treatment regimens to clear these infections and the high levels of Hp recurrence. She then moved to the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver where she worked at The Biomedical Research Centre as a research assistant for Dr. Sarah Townsend, and performed seminal studies on the cellular communication between B and T cells that lead to the induction of tolerance. She subsequently obtained her PhD in the laboratory of Dr. Brett Finlay at UBC where she dissected the host cellular and immunological response to Salmonella. This work revealed novel innate responses to intracellular pathogens and that have significant implications for human disease including the mechanisms driving acute inflammation, infectious colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. An important offshoot of this work was the development of a novel and robust model of severe and persistent intestinal fibrosis. Intestinal fibrosis is a serious complication of Crohn’s disease, with one third of Crohn’s disease patients developing intestinal obstructions that require surgical intervention. Her model offers a platform for investigating both host and bacterial contributions to inflammatory bowel diseases as well as opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In 2014, Dr. Valdez joined StemCell Technologies as a scientist and was quickly promoted to Team Lead in 2016. Dr. Valdez currently supervises a team focused on the development of innovative cell separation kits for the study of innate immune cells including the newly discovered innate lymphoid cells (ILC). These kits serve as invaluable tools for mechanistic studies into innate immune responses.

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Antonio Sica, PhD

Associate Professor of Pathology,
University of Piemonte Orientale A. Avogadro, Novara, Italy
Head laboratori of Molecular Immunology
Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milan

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Antonio Sica, PhD is Professor of Pathology, Department of Pharmacological Sciences (DISCAFF), University of Piemonte, and director of the laboratory of Molecular Immunology at the Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, Milan, Italy. He obtained his PhD in Immunology at the Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, in 1989. He joined the National Cancer Institute (1990-1995) as postdoctoral researcher and, subsequently, as group leader. During his scientific career he provided contributions to the field of Inflammation and Immunity. He first described the divergent regulation of chemokine receptors and ligands, in response to pro- and anti-inflammatory signals. During the last fifteen years he focused his attention on the investigation of inflammatory cells and molecules expressed within the tumor microenvironmentand and their role in tumor development. His research is focused on the investigation of mechanisms driving the tumor-promoting phenotype of Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, a well as the mechanism supporting the pathological expansion of suppressor myeloid cells during “emergency Hematopoiesis” associated with cancer development.
Prof. Sica is a member of different international scientific societies and has authored and co-authored more than 120 articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as Nature, Immunity, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, Journal of Immunology, Blood, Cancer Cell, Nature Communications, Cancer Research and the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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